MASS INTENTIONS

Jan. 23 – 30
Sat. 4:30 p.m. Lucille Leger
Sun. 7:30 a.m. Domingo Mireles
Sun. 10:00 a.m. People of the Parish
Wed. 8:00 a.m. Micky Jannise
Thurs. 8:00 a.m. Donald Shauberger
Fri. 8:00 a.m. Tommy Leon


Ministry Schedule
30 Jan. 4:30 p.m.
Lector: Karen Halsell
31 Jan. 7:30 a.m.
Lector: Ward Lowe
31 Jan. 10:00 a.m.
Lector: Vicki Lemke
Money Counters: Liz Gallier & Rachal Jordan


PLEASE PRAY FOR THOSE WHO ARE SICK: Tim Baker, Elliott Bounds, Emma
Edwards, Sandra Hall, Barbara Hawkins, Gerald Fontenot, Yvonne Godeaux, Denise Klages,
Romanell Martin, Hazel Trahan, Christine Voan & Tommy Wright.


BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK: Cecilia Deleon, Wesley Huff, Sue McCarty, Martie McCown,
Jeffery Melancon & Debbi Roberds. Happy Birthday, May God Bless You!


ROSARY
We have a group of parishioners that meet on Wednesdays at 6:00 p.m. in the church to pray the
rosary. Please join us!

 

SECOND COLLECTION

Second collection today for the Church in Latin America. Please be generous.


CCD/CYO
We will have classes every other Sunday, starting January 31, 2021. Any questions call Melody
Wells at 409-782-4115.


Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
Our readings today speak of “Kairos” times, of God proclaiming new moments of opportunity of
encounter with the Divine. From Jonah, we hear of God’s summons to the people of Nineveh to turn
from evil. We hear Paul tell the church in Corinth that those who live in Christ must avoid clinging to
anything transient, as all is secondary to God. And we hear of the beginning of Jesus’ ministry in
Mark, as Jesus proclaims a moment of both opportunity and crisis. In these passages, there are no delaying tactics, no getting caught up in life’s distractions. Just a simple moment of choice. Perhaps we have had “Kairos” moments like these, or we may be facing one now. Sometimes, amid the complexities and uncertainties of our lives, clear choices emerge, and God asks us to choose. And our always patient and merciful God will accompany us in our choices.

 

THE INAUGURATION
Mark describes the beginning of Jesus’ ministry with his proclamation that the “kingdom of
God is at hand.” The rest of Mark’s Gospel—all of Jesus’ preaching and healing, his death and
resurrection—describes the inauguration of this kingdom of God. For Mark, the life of Jesus is
the center point of history, where everything leads up to Jesus, and everything follows from
Jesus. Mark then tells us that the first disciples follow Jesus immediately and wholeheartedly.
They leave their work and family, all for Jesus. Because compared to Jesus and the life he
offers, everything else is secondary.
Perhaps our invitations from God do not entail such dramatic life changes. But all who follow
Jesus are called to align our life and values with his ways of love. As we continue to mature in
love and in faith, we might ask: What needs to be renewed, re-oriented, or discarded in light of
our life in Christ?


JONAH AND NINEVEH
Jonah makes a rare appearance this week. The book of Jonah is a fascinating tale of God,
stubborn Jonah, surprising Nineveh, and the famous fish (or whale). Please consider reading the
whole book, just 48 verses, together with a good commentary. The book is read at Jewish
services at Yom Kippur, as a profound reflection about God and about all of us.
Today’s passage takes place shortly after Jonah’s time in the fish’s belly. Jonah finally performs
the task that God asks of him, to call the people of Nineveh to repentance. (Nineveh was
notorious for its brutality.) Their sudden repentance is bitterly accepted by Jonah, as he resents
God’s mercy for Nineveh. God reminds Jonah that the people of Nineveh are God’s beloved
too. Like the parable of the Prodigal Son, the story hints at the vastness of God’s mercy,
especially forgiveness of those who seem least deserving. We are reminded that all of us are
sinners, and we are all in need of God’s mercy.

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