Welcome

 

Welcome, and thank you for visiting Our Lady of Sorrows Church online. We hope that our website gives you the information you are seeking. Please feel free to read more about our church on this site, or come in for a visit. We would love to greet you and share with you our love for Jesus Christ and for you, our neighbor.

Our Faith

 

We believe that the door to salvation is always open and so are the doors to our church. Our mission is to be fully devoted to Jesus by opening our arms to those in search of the truth. We show God’s love and concern for our fellow man at every opportunity. Through works of charity and opening our doors to listen and love, we feel that we are walking in the footsteps of Jesus Christ.

Mass Times

 

Mass is held in the Church:

Saturday evening at 4:30 PM
Sunday Morning at 7:30 AM and 10:00 AM.

Weekdays: Wednesday, Thursday & Friday at 8:00 AM

Reconciliation: Saturday 3:30-4:00 PM

Baptism by appointment.

Weddings:  Begin by calling the parish office 6 months prior to provisional wedding date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The seven sacraments—Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Communion, Confession, Marriage, Holy Orders, and the Anointing of the Sick—are the life of the Catholic Church. Each sacrament is an outward sign of an inward grace. When we participate in them worthily, each provides us with graces—with the life of God in our soul.

Baptism

For Catholics, the Sacrament of Baptism is the first step in a lifelong journey of commitment and discipleship. Whether we are baptized as infants or adults, Baptism is the Church's way of celebrating and enacting the embrace of God.

 

Eucharist

Catholics believe the Eucharist, or Communion, is both a sacrifice and a meal. We believe in the real presence of Jesus, who died for our sins. As we receive Christ's Body and Blood, we also are nourished spiritually and brought closer to God.

 

Reconciliation

The Catholic Sacrament of Reconciliation (also known as Penance, or Penance and Reconciliation) has three elements: conversion, confession and celebration. In it we find God's unconditional forgiveness; as a result we are called to forgive others.

 

Confirmation
Confirmation is a Catholic Sacrament of mature Christian commitment and a deepening of baptismal gifts. It is one of the three Sacraments of Initiation for Catholics. It is most often associated with the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

 

Marriage
For Catholics, the Sacrament of Marriage, or Holy Matrimony, is a public sign that one gives oneself totally to this other person. It is also a public statement about God: the loving union of husband and wife speaks of family values and also God's values.

 

Holy Orders
In the Sacrament of Holy Orders, or Ordination, the priest being ordained vows to lead other Catholics by bringing them the sacraments (especially the Eucharist), by proclaiming the Gospel, and by providing other means to holiness.

 

Anointing of the Sick
The Catholic Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick, formerly known as Last Rites or Extreme Unction, is a ritual of healing appropriate not only for physical but also for mental and spiritual sickness.

TODAY’S READINGS

First Reading — The Lord said to Job: Who shut within doors the sea? And who said: Thus far shall you come but no farther! (Job 38:1, 8-11).

Psalm — Give thanks to the Lord, his love is everlasting (Psalm 107).

Second Reading — Whoever is in Christ is a new creation (2 Corinthians 5:14-17).

Gospel — Who is this whom even wind and sea obey? (Mark 4:35-41).

THE WIND AND THE SEA

Living along the shores of Lake Superior—the “big lake,” as the locals call it—you can often hear the advice, “Respect the lake; don’t take it for granted.” People who know Lake Superior respect its power and watch out for its many moods. Sunken ships and boats crushed into kindling are testimonies to what the lake can do. The readings of this Sunday evoke our memories of the lake, of the mighty Mississippi River, or of the ocean itself. Who but God can control these mighty waters and set limits to their advance? The lake described in today’s Gospel was a body of water subject to sudden storms and churned into dangerous waves by terrible winds. But these mighty agents are subject to God. The sailor and the fisher all respect the water. Even more, they respect the awesome power of the Maker of wind and sea.

FEAST OF FAITH

The Collection: A Privilege

As the altar is prepared for the celebration of the Eucharist, the collection is taken up. In the early church, this part of the Mass must have been something to behold, as the people suddenly began to move, bringing forward to the deacons and priests freshly-baked bread and fine wine. Then, after the Eucharistic Prayer, that same community came forward again in the Communion procession, and they received back the very gifts they had given, now transformed into something infinitely more precious than bread and wine: the very Body and Blood of Christ.

Beginning around the eleventh century, it became the custom for people to present money instead of bread and wine, and the procession of the faithful gradually disappeared (it survives in the liturgy of Holy Thursday). But the meaning is the same. We continue to bring the fruit of our labors and to offer them freely to God. And God continues to transform them into Christ. It is through our generous sharing of time, talent, and treasure that our parishes can preach the gospel, reach out to the sick and the imprisoned, and celebrate the sacraments.

REFLECTION

Jesus' power is greater than anything on earth. Nature is a powerful force, and yet with three simple words, Quiet! Be still! Jesus showed that his power was greater. Jesus is here for us , too, to calm the storms in our lives and to draw us closer to him. We do our part by nourishing our faith and strengthening our relationship with Jesus as we journey with him toward the kingdom of God.